The long and short of it

Nathan Coulter-Nile's three pivotal wickets were the set-up for a low-scoring thriller Getty Images

Bouncers, wrong'uns, yorkers, inswingers - our T20I bowling nominees brought everything they had to the fight. Click here for the T20I batting nominees

Nathan Coulter-Nile
3 for 26 v India
first T20I, Vishakapatnam
Coulter-Nile proved the decisive point of difference with his testing lengths in this low-scoring thriller on an iffy pitch, the first match of Australia's limited-overs tour of India early in 2019. KL Rahul had done well to get a fifty, when Coulter-Nile got rid of him with one that cramped him for room, which Rahul spooned to mid-off. Four balls later, he bowled Dinesh Karthik through the gate with one that cut in, and off the last ball of his next over he had Krunal Pandya launching one to the fielder at backward point.

Chris Jordan
4 for 6 v West Indies
second T20I, Basseterre
Shockingly beaten in the Test series, and having drawn the ODI one, England went into the T20Is against West Indies with pride on the line. Here, Sam Billings was Man of the Match for his 87, but it was Jordan who tilted the scales, with his sharp pace and bounce, taking two wickets in each of his two overs and putting paid to West Indies' formidable middle-order hitters - Dwayne Bravo, Jason Holder, Nicholas Pooran and Fabian Allen. West Indies were all out for 45, the lowest T20I total by a Full Member team.

David Willey
4 for 7 v West Indies
third T20I, Basseterre
Willey applied the finishing touches to the T20I leg of England's otherwise forgettable tour of West Indies. Opening the attack here, he had Shai Hope with his second ball, a full inswinger. Shimron Hetmyer was despatched with a slower one in Willey's second over, and then came two in three balls: John Campbell caught off an ugly swipe and Dwayne Bravo nicking behind. West Indies were 24 for 4 and didn't get a toe in the door all game.

Navdeep Saini
3 for 17 v West Indies
first T20I, Lauderhill
In his debut international, Saini accounted for West Indies' big three middle-order men - Nicholas Pooran, Kieron Pollard and Shimron Hetmyer - to keep them to an under-par 95. The first two wickets came off successive balls as Pooran and Hetmyer took Saini on with extravagant shots that didn't pay off. Pollard was beaten in the final over as he looked to smear one and it ended up hitting him on the full. India got to the target with room to spare.

Lasith Malinga
5 for 6 v New Zealand
third T20I, Pallekele
In the 2007 World Cup, Malinga became the first bowler to take four wickets in four balls in an international. A dozen years later, with another three international hat-tricks under his belt, he did it again. Sri Lanka had finished on 125 but Malinga made sure it didn't matter, not giving New Zealand a sniff, cutting them down to 23 for 5 on his own, with vicious movement off the surface and in the air. He finished with five wickets off nine balls, conceding a single run in that period - a leg-side wide.

Beuran Hendricks
2 for 14 v India
third T20I, Bengaluru
Hendricks only took two wickets in this match but they were impactful. South Africa were trailing 0-1 in the T20Is and Hendricks played a major role in keeping India down to 134, with searching, bouncy left-arm seam bowling that was hard to get away. Rohit Sharma fell edging one that held its line - the third time in four balls in international cricket that Hendricks had his number. Krunal Pandya's dismissal was similar: edging a back-of-a-length delivery to the keeper. Hendricks finished with an economy rate of 3.5 - by far the best of all the bowlers on show.

Wanindu Hasaranga
3 for 21 v Pakistan
third T20I, Lahore
After defeat in the ODI series, Sri Lanka had their revenge in the T20Is on their landmark tour of Pakistan, when they became the first big-name team to tour there in ten years. Legspinner Hasaranga was in no small way responsible: in this, the last match, he produced another three-wicket bag, his second in as many games, fetching his side a whitewash. The decisive blows came in the 18th over, when he had Asif Ali caught at long-on, before bowling Sarfaraz Ahmed for the second match in a row with a googly.

Mitchell Santner
3 for 25 v England
second T20I, Wellington
Santner brought New Zealand back into the series after they lost the first match, in Christchurch. England were on track in their chase of 177 at 40 for 2 in the fifth over when he struck first, getting Eoin Morgan to heave across the line of a full one outside off and hole out. In the 11th over, Sam Curran slogged at one sliding across him for the same result. The last wicket was that of Chris Jordan, who had mounted a resistance with 36 off 19; England's fight ended with his dismissal.

Deepak Chahar
6 for 7 v Bangladesh
third T20I, Nagpur
Chahar's performance is the current record for the best ever T20I bowling innings, beating by one run Ajantha Mendis' six-for from 2012. He first struck in the third over, getting rid of Liton Das and Soumya Sarkar off successive deliveries. Mohammad Mithun was suckered by a slower delivery in the 13th, when Bangladesh seemed to be in the driving seat. Chahar then cleaned up the tail with a hat-trick spread over his last two overs. He brought his knowledge of bowling at the ground for the Chennai Super Kings to the fore, using his variations with deft control, adjusting his length on a grippy, wet surface to record-breaking effect.

Karim Janat
5 for 11 v West Indies
second T20I, Lucknow
The tide turned for Afghanistan in this game - they levelled the T20I series here and went on to win it, having lost the ODI leg earlier. Janat's numbers were none too impressive going into the game, but he produced a bowling performance seemingly buoyed by his freewheeling 26 off 18 with the bat earlier in the match. The three-wicket spell where he got rid of Evin Lewis, Sherfane Rutherford and Kieron Pollard in eight balls was the key. Before he came on, West Indies were steady, if slow, at 34 for 1 in seven overs; when he was done with that spell, the score was 55 for 5 in 12 overs.

Click here for the T20I batting nominees and here for ESPNcricinfo Awards 2019 home