NFL memo reminds teams they're not obligated to pay players who suffer injuries away from facilities

The NFL reminded teams Wednesday that they are not obligated to pay players who suffer an injury away from the team facility, an issue that moved this week to the center of an ongoing dispute between the league and NFL Players Association over in-person participation in offseason workouts.

The memo, obtained by ESPN, was prompted by several prominent players who were surprised by media reports about Denver Broncos offensive lineman Ja'Wuan James, who tore an Achilles tendon this week while working out on his own and could miss the 2021 season. NFL contracts have long classified such injuries as "non-football" injuries, because they happen away from the team environment, and they are not covered by typical injury guarantees. As a result, the Broncos could withhold James' salary for as long as he is sidelined. More than $10 million would have been guaranteed if the injury had occurred at the Broncos' facility.

The NFL has noted this contractual leverage multiple times during negotiations with the NFLPA, which has advised players to skip the voluntary portion of in-person offseason training unless they stand to lose workout bonuses.

Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes was among those who seemed unaware of the full implications of "non-football' injuries in comments this week on social media.

"According to the media coverage," the NFL wrote in its memo, "several players have expressed surprise that Mr. James' injury was not covered by his Injury Guarantee, although this point has been made frequently in our discussions with the NFLPA about the offseason program. Clubs are encouraged to remind players of the significant injury-related protection provided if they choose to work out at the club facility and the risks they undertake in choosing to train in non-NFL locations."