Jalen Hurts: In hindsight, transfer to OU 'happened for a reason'

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Hurts honors Bama, Oklahoma with double-sided helmet for Senior Bowl (0:20)

Jalen Hurts plans to wear a dual-sided helmet, representing both Alabama and Oklahoma, in the 2020 Senior Bowl. (0:20)

MOBILE, Ala. -- Former Oklahoma Sooners and Alabama Crimson Tide quarterback Jalen Hurts said there isn't any decision or move he would change from his college career, which saw him start at QB for two of the most storied programs in college football.

"I don't think there is any experience that I would go back and exchange or change," said Hurts, speaking to media at Senior Bowl events. "Everything has happened for a reason. It's all happened as it's supposed to.

"I think I'm stronger, wiser, a better man, player, leader for everything."

Hurts began his career at Alabama, starting 28 games before he was benched in favor of likely 2020 first-round pick Tua Tagovailoa before the start of the 2018 season. Hurts threw for 5,626 yards, 48 touchdowns and 12 interceptions at Alabama. He also rushed for 23 touchdowns.

Hurts transferred to Oklahoma after the 2018 season and started for the Sooners in 2019. He threw for 3,851 yards, 32 touchdowns and eight interceptions this past season.

As for this week, all Hurts believes he needs to do is "be me."

Hurts received a special Riddell helmet with the Alabama logo on one side and the Oklahoma logo on the other, but at this point, it is not clear whether he will wear the helmet in the game.

Senior Bowl director Jim Nagy gave Hurts the helmet. A second one will be auctioned to raise money for Special Spectators.

The Sooners went 12-2 in Hurts' only season at OU, which ended on a sour note, as they lost 63-28 to eventual national champion LSU in a College Football Playoff semifinal. Hurts completed 15 of 31 passes for 217 yards with one interception and ran for two scores.

This year marked Hurts' fourth straight season in which his team reached the playoff. He helped lead Alabama to a national championship in 2017.

ESPN's Mark Schlabach contributed to this report.