Rams' house tours, Chargers' cornhole competition highlight 'Hard Knocks'

Jalen Ramsey's house-shopping tour on "Hard Knocks" showed that he wants to stay in Los Angeles long term. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

House tours and cornhole, but no live football.

"Hard Knocks: Los Angeles" continued Tuesday, featuring scenes far away from the gridiron, as Los Angeles Rams and Los Angeles Chargers players adjusted to the canceled preseason schedule and powered through the slow burn of training camp.

Rams cornerback Jalen Ramsey went house hunting, and quarterback Jared Goff created backyard envy with a chipping green.

"Oct. 15, I got traded from the Jacksonville Jaguars to the L.A. Rams," Ramsey said while touring a sprawling 31-acre property with a house built of steel. "Probably one of the best days of my life."

Ramsey, who says his abs also are made of steel, remains in the hunt for a contract extension as he enters the final season of his five-year rookie deal and is scheduled to earn $13.7 million.

Goff got paid last year with a four-year, $134 million extension and appears to be living every part of the California dream after he converted some unused land on his property to a chipping green.

"I think it works," said Goff, who throws with his right hand but swings a club as a lefty. "I've got to make one before we go."

It's uncertain how long Goff spent chipping away, but at least this time around, he did not drain a shot.

While the Rams leaned into HGTV, the Chargers defensive backs opted for a friendly competition of patio cornhole -- a good game with social distancing in mind.

However, here's to hoping -- for the Chargers' sake -- that Chris Harris Jr., Casey Hayward Jr., Brandon Facyson and Derwin James are better at coverage than they are at throwing a bean bag into a hole.

"Go get your plate, go get your water and rejuvenate!" James said, capping off a long game of trash talk and a victory over his teammates. "I don't lose."

As for other highlights from episode No. 2:

While there are no preseason games, which is typically a staple for Episode 2 of any "Hard Knocks" season, both teams did inch closer to real training camp practices -- the kind with full pads -- as they wound down the acclimation, or glorified walk-through portion, of camp.

Rams defensive tackle Aaron Donald continued to flex his Instagram-worthy muscles, cornerback Donte Deayon kept spreading joy as he intimidated receivers with glowing smiles and giggles, and rookie linebacker Clay Johnston talked himself into overthinking every defensive call.

"Hey guys, just be loud!" Johnston said, before mumbling all kinds of inaudible sounds under his breath. "I want to make it look, mmmm, freaking perfect!"

It's not easy being a rookie with no in-person offseason program and no preseason games to prove your playmaking ability. A seventh-round pick, Johnston faces an uphill battle to make the roster.

That's a common theme across the league, and in L.A., this season.

One rookie who doesn't have to worry about making the cut is quarterback Justin Herbert, the Chargers' first-round pick (No. 6 overall). There's no timeline for Herbert to earn the starting job, but the rookie appears to be on a promising track.

"He's a sharp young man," Lynn told Chargers owner Dean Spanos. "Trying to get him to talk and communicate a little bit more. He's quiet. Usually at that position, you're a big mouth. Got to let him do it through his own personality."

Lynn also provided undrafted rookie Darius Bradwell a vote of confidence for his potential, but then pointed him toward strength coach John Lott to help get him in shape.

"This ain't no pie-eating contest," Lott said to Bradwell, who reported to camp 20 pounds heavier than expected. Lott helped the rookie through an extra workout, then provided a lasting reminder, "What you do in the dark shines in the light. So don't be stinkin' eatin' no stinkin' tacos at midnight on me."

Then, there's COVID-19. This "Hard Knocks" season wouldn't be complete without addressing it.

The pandemic continues, and -- a week after Lynn revealed he tested positive for the virus in June, the Chargers received another dose of reality, at least for a minute. Chargers offensive quality control assistant Seth Ryan, yes the son of Rex, tested positive for COVID-19.

"If he can get it, anybody can get it," receivers coach Phil McGeoghan told his players on a Zoom call about Ryan. "He doesn't go out, he's been playing 'Call of Duty' or working on football stuff for five months."

Luckily for Ryan and the Chargers, the COVID-19 test later was found to be a false positive.