Chris Scott: Bring on top-of-the-ladder Power

Chris Scott sees no reason a daily AFL dose, or at least an abridged version of it, shouldn't continue next season as his Geelong side eye ladder-leading Port Adelaide on just three days of rest.

The Cats made light work of St Kilda at the Gabba on Monday, kicking the last nine goals to win by 59 points and jump ahead of the Saints into the top four.

Their Gold Coast meeting with the Power will be Geelong's fourth game since August 1 and the Cats coach can find merit in AFL's stacked schedule.

"There's nothing that I'm seeing that says this sort of model is impossible into the future," he said.

"Famous last words now, we could get a horrible result (on Friday), but (starting fresh) with 18 teams there's no way you'd run a 22-round competition.

"And from a spectacle perspective, most people I know that follow footy are loving that it's on every night.

"You could you do it - our players will probably curse me for saying it's possible - you couldn't do it every week, but some version of it is possible."

Scott said the Power deserved their No.1 billing.

"We can't sit back and spend too much time on tonight but I don't think it'll be a challenge to get ourselves up for it, because the opposition is so good, the danger is so clear," he said.

"I smile, because I feel fine but we've planned it ... the club's done a good job with the macro and the micro (managing ongoing injuries) is always going to be flexible."

He said Esava Ratugolea was likely to return against Port after being rotated out of Monday's team, while Nakia Cockatoo was one of "eight to 10" pressing for his first game since early in the 2018 season.

Tom Hawkins kicked five goals in the win, while the returning Gary Rohan booted four and Sam Menegola coupled 26 touches with two majors.

It was a lesson for the up-and-coming St Kilda but Scott didn't think it was a simple case of older heads prevailing.

"I'm not sure how much we should dwell on what Geelong's been," he said.

"We have some players who've been there and done that but the majority aren't resting on their laurels.

"There are new faces and they're certainly not living on the coat tails ... they're trying to make their own way."