Panthers defend NRL culture amid May saga

Tyrone May of the Panthers puts a fend on Tom Trbojevic of the Sea Eagles. Matt King/Getty Images

Penrith have come out swinging in defence of their culture amid the NRL sex tape scandal which has resulted in Tyrone May being stood down.

Just 10 days out from their season opener, the Panthers are a club under siege after the release of four sex tapes over the past week involving three players.

Former NSW Origin coach Laurie Daley had lashed the western Sydney club earlier this week, saying he wouldn't want his son playing for the Panthers - however he has back-tracked on his comments.

After copping criticism from Penrith greats Mark Geyer and Greg Alexander, Daley reneged on his comments on Thursday's Big Sports Breakfast radio program.

The NRL stood May down indefinitely after he was charged with two counts of recording intimate image without consent, and two counts of disseminate image without consent.

On Thursday, a legal challenge by Jack de Belin was held over in the Federal Court because the NRL had not yet drafted its "no fault" stand down rules.

Effectively, it means de Belin and May are not suspended - however that will change when the NRL finally signs off on the rules, which is expected to happen in the next 48 hours.

Penrith coach Ivan Cleary used the club's season launch on Wednesday to claim that those knocking the club's culture were doing so because of jealousy.

Co-captain Isaah Yeo said the club's critics were doing so from afar and didn't have an insight into their values.

"A lot of the time, it's people on the outside looking in," Yeo said at Thursday's NRL season launch in Bondi.

"We're very confident in the culture that we've got.

"The people that are saying that don't know the community, they don't know the town, the surrounding area and what it consists of. I'm very confident in the culture we've got."

Yeo said if there was any club well placed to pull through the adversity of a distracting off-field scandal, it was the Panthers' group.

"We're a tight-knit bunch. It's not an ideal situation but we've come through the grades together. A lot of the boys are tight friends who went to school together, played Harold (Matthews Cup), SG Ball," Yeo said.

"I think if there was a team to come through this off-field adversity, it's us. We've got the friendships there to help us through it.

"Coming through the grades, they form that bond."